Data Sets Used on this Website

Ongoing Data

These data sets will be updated periodically as new data is obtained.


Fairfield County Youth Survey Data 

The Fairfield County Youth Behavior Survey has been conducted every two years since 2004.  The most recent biennial survey was implemented in all public schools and one parochial school in May 2014. Students in grades 10 and 12 participated each time.  The results of the surveys provide a benchmark for alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATOD) use as well as an indication of negative and problematic behavior among our youth. These behaviors are anonymously self-reported.  Data was collected by the Family, Adult, and Children First (FACF) in collaboration with the Fairfield County ADAMH Board, who conducted the data analysis in years 2004 through 2010.  In 2012 and 2014, the data collected by FACF was analyzed by Ohio University. Aggregate summary data is published on the FACF and ADAMH websites.


Fairfield County Young Adult Prevention Initiative

A Young Adult Survey which focused on prescription drug abuse was conducted in 2012, 2013 and 2014 as part of the Ohio Strategic Prevention Framework—State Incentive Grant (SPF-SIG) that was received by the Fairfield County ADAMH Board and Fairfield County Family, Adult and Children First Council from the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services.  Ohio University provided overall guidance on the project.  The main work of this grant was undertaken by the Young Adult Prevention Initiative (YAPI) Coalition.  Due to the nature and progression of the grant, the individual level survey changed from year to year although some questions were maintained on all three surveys.   Survey data was collected via online and paper surveys by the YAPI Coalition (of which both FACF and ADAMH were a part).  FACF then provided to the ADAMH Board the data for analysis.   Data was collected and results reported by geographic area:  Ohio University – Lancaster/Pickerington, Lancaster, and Pickerington (only 2012 & 2013). This survey will be done every two years starting in 2016.

Ohio Automated Prescription (Rx) Reporting System (OARRS) 

This data comes from OARRS (Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System), our Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in Ohio.  The effective use of PDMPs continues to be among the most promising interventions to improve painkiller prescribing, inform clinical practice, and protect patients. The data is divided into four categories, Opiates & Pain Relievers, Benzodiazepines, Sedatives and Stimulants and covers the date range of 2010 to the present.  It is further divided into total doses dispensed, number of doses per patient and number of doses per capita, for both Ohio and Fairfield County. New data is received every quarter.


Of One Mind Survey

This data comes from a local survey which began in 2010 and is conducted every two years by the Fairfield County ADAMH Board. Community volunteers conduct a phone survey, called Of One Mind, to measure Fairfield County’s awareness of mental illness and substance abuse.  A telephone number list was purchased from NFocus and numbers were randomly selected to be called.  The goal of each survey was to assess the degree of stigma and misperception that exists about these diseases and to determine the extent to which mental illness and substance abuse affect the county’s citizens.  The surveys are weighted to account for age and gender, based on 2010 census data.


Arrest

Arrest data (public record) was obtained for each year beginning with 2011.  This data lists every person who was arrested and what those charges were.  It contains some demographic data, including name, age, city, state, zip code, and race/ethnicity.



One-time Data

This data looks at a specific slice of time but will not be updated in the future; it was obtained as part of the Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Abuse Program Grant received from Bureau of Justice Assistance and provides a look at those in the criminal justice system as well as some who are receiving substance abuse treatment during 2014-2015.


Jail Screening

Individuals booked into the Fairfield County jail from March 2014 through June 2015 have been screened for a potential substance use disorder at intake by Jail Staff. No releases are signed; it is done as part of the booking.  Intoxicated individuals and/or cognitively impaired inmates were not screened.  The Simple Screening Instrument (SSI), a validated screening used widely throughout the nation, was used.  The suggested cut-off scores are 0-3 (minimal risk for alcohol or drug abuse), and 4 or greater (moderate to high risk) help to identify the extent to which the inmate population may have a substance use disorder that warrants additional assessment and referral.  Jail Staff subsequently provided the screening data 1)to the Recovery Center Harold Rogers Grant funded Staff person and included each individual report in the inmate’s jail  medical file., and 2)  The Recovery Center who provided the data to the ADAMH Board and the National Center for State Courts (NCSC).  NCSC then analyzed the individual identified data and returned de-identified data to the ADAMH Board.  Roughly 5,000 screens were completed.   


Jail Assessment

Data was drawn from face-to-face interviews with Fairfield County jail inmates (n=146)       conducted in 2014 and the first half of 2015. These jail inmates scored ≥ 4 on the Simple Screening Instrument (SSI) indicating moderate to high risk for alcohol or drug abuse. The face-to- face interviewers were conducted by clinicians employed by The Recovery Center with the written consent of the inmate to participate in data collection.  The collection of data was conducted as part of a Bureau of Justice Assistance grant.  The privacy restrictions approved by the National Center for State Court’s Institutional Review Board were followed.  Limited demographics were collected to ensure anonymity.  The jail sample was primarily male (62%) and white (97%).  This data was sent directly to NCSC by The Recovery Center.


Follow-Up Data

From all jail inmates who took the assessment, a smaller subset was chosen of inmates who had been released at least six months.  NCSC sent names to New Horizons, The Recovery Center, Mid-Ohio Psychological Services and American Court Services to determine the extent to which these individuals connect with services in the community upon release.  These jail inmates gave consent to be tracked, upon release, when they signed the consent to be part of this research project. The privacy restrictions approved by the National Center for State Court’s Institutional Review Board were followed. 


Needs Assessment Questionnaires 

Needs Assessment Questionnaires were developed by NCSC and administered to persons on probation, in drug court, and in treatment for an addiction disorder.  Staff at each location requested clients to anonymously complete the survey.  The surveys were then returned to the ADAMH Board who forwarded them to NCSC for scanning and data analysis.


Probation 

This data is from voluntary written surveys with probationers who were on supervision in 2014. The collection of data was conducted as part of a Bureau of Justice Assistance grant. The privacy restrictions approved by the National Center for State Court’s Institutional Review Board were followed.  NCSC analyzed the data and returned it to ADAMH.


Drug Court 

This data is from voluntary written surveys with drug court participants who were on supervision in 2014. The collection of data was conducted as part of a Bureau of Justice Assistance grant. The privacy restrictions approved by the National Center for State Court’s Institutional Review Board were followed. NCSC analyzed the data and returned it to ADAMH.


Substance Abuse Treatment Agency 

This data is from voluntary written surveys individuals enrolled in substance abuse treatment at a local agency in 2014. The collection of data was conducted as part of a Bureau of Justice Assistance grant. The privacy restrictions approved by the National Center for State Court’s Institutional Review Board were followed. NCSC analyzed the data and returned it to ADAMH.